F1 Returns to Classic Mexico – Sort Of

The main news this week in between the German and Hungarian races has been the announcement that F1 has signed a 5 year deal to race in Mexico from next season. With two drivers in the field along with telecoms giant Tel Mex heavily involved in the sport it was a logical move to bring a race to Mexico. After the (apparent) failure of the New Jersey race there was still scope for another race in the Americas and with the amount of Mexicans visiting the Grand Prix in Texas the market is quite clearly there.

After many discussions of new tracks the sport will return to the Autodromo Hermanos Rodrigez for the first time since 1992 however as suspected many changes at the track are necessary to accommodate modern F1 machinery. The biggest issue with the track is its final corner the Peraltada which is a long 180 degree left hander onto the start finish straight. The corner is hugely fast and features little to no run off. Further adding to the complications are a large public dual carriageway which now sits behind the corner and the construction in 1993 of the Foro Sol baseball stadium which makes the entry to the corner completely blind. This will be solved be diverting the cars into the baseball stadium itself and then out mid way onto the final turn. When Champ Car raced at the circuit in the 2000’s the corner was deemed too dangerous and a chicane was added before the turn to slow the cars down, this from a series where the cars were designed to run on walled ovals.

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However the track features more re-profiling alongside the curious decision to add more hairpins than necessary into the final corner sequence. The first two sections of turns have been tightened, one would assume to promote overtaking and slightly reduce corning speeds in the modern cars, but this should provide similar speeds to the old track when raced using late 80’s machinery. The removal of the first ess in the sweeping section again is likely due to run off requirements as it gets close to a bank of tress, however this will speed up the cars entry into the remaining corners. Previously the track featured grass run off into tarmacked areas but we’d unfortunately expect run off areas to be heavily tarmacked despite already providing punishing but safe run off.

The track was built out in a park in 1962 but the city has grown out to meet it and now sits as a sporting oasis in a metropolitan sprawl. When the track underwent its last regeneration in 2001 it pulled a staggering 402,413 spectators to the race. With a best of both worlds situation of a permanent circuit in a populous area it could be primed to pull in huge crowds to cheer on Sergio Perez if it is priced correctly and one can only hope this will be the case after witnessing the sparse grand stands of the Hockenheimring last weekend.

It is again another return to a classic circuit after Austria’s triumphant re-appearance a few weeks ago, the loss of the final corner was to be expected (many commentators believed the sport wouldn’t return to the track due to not being able to re profile the last turn) but the decision to change so much of the circuit is a curious one and it will remain to be seen how much character will remain. The circuit will join Texas and Brazil towards the end of the season Americas leg again leaving Canada as a stand alone race in the great white north. However there are a mooted 23 roundss lined up for next years championship as along with the 19 races from this season along with Mexico there will be a return of India (which was only on a “break” this year), Azerbaijan (Baku street race) and New Jersey. As mentioned before all indications are that the New Jersey race has fallen through, furthermore¬† the political situation hasn’t shifted any in India meaning the sport is unlikely to return there. This still leaves another race to face the chop if the Baku street race goes ahead as the calendar is unlike to go beyond 20 events but the political situation in Russia may create the appropriate opening.

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